Because I don't know it all

This is as amazing as it is beautiful as it is terrifying.

itscolossal:

Waltz on the Walls: An Aerial Dance Performance on the Side of Oakland’s City Hall

Source: itscolossal
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GoldieBlox = instareblog.
fastcompany:

While her character GoldieBlox engineers fantastical creations, Debbie Starling engineered a successful company, with the help of her market vision and rapid prototyping skills. (A little controversy with the Beastie Boys didn’t hurt either).
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GoldieBlox = instareblog.

fastcompany:

While her character GoldieBlox engineers fantastical creations, Debbie Starling engineered a successful company, with the help of her market vision and rapid prototyping skills. (A little controversy with the Beastie Boys didn’t hurt either).

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Source: fastcoexist.com
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Neat idea for encouraging the surfacing of issues within a company.
fastcompany:

Groupthink can set in for new employees in mere days—which is why you should ask them on Day One what’s wrong with your company.
When something isn’t working out quite right, CEOs are often the last to know. But not at Emerald Therapeutics.
The biotech startup tasks all new hires with an unusual mandate: each new employee must fill out a “fresh-eye journal” criticizing and analyzing all aspects of the company. Newcomers are asked questions like “Describe a decision that the company has made that raises an eyebrow for you?” And their feedback is read by company co-CEOS Brian Frezza and D.J. Kleinbaum.
Frezza and Kleinbaum say they came up with the idea a year ago to help their startup avoid the trappings of corporate dysfunction and groupthink. After all, they founded Emerald with the idea of taking advantage of such weaknesses in the biotech industry.
Read More>

Neat idea for encouraging the surfacing of issues within a company.

fastcompany:

Groupthink can set in for new employees in mere days—which is why you should ask them on Day One what’s wrong with your company.

When something isn’t working out quite right, CEOs are often the last to know. But not at Emerald Therapeutics.

The biotech startup tasks all new hires with an unusual mandate: each new employee must fill out a “fresh-eye journal” criticizing and analyzing all aspects of the company. Newcomers are asked questions like “Describe a decision that the company has made that raises an eyebrow for you?” And their feedback is read by company co-CEOS Brian Frezza and D.J. Kleinbaum.

Frezza and Kleinbaum say they came up with the idea a year ago to help their startup avoid the trappings of corporate dysfunction and groupthink. After all, they founded Emerald with the idea of taking advantage of such weaknesses in the biotech industry.

Read More>

Source: Fast Company
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(via gjmueller)

Source: battleforthenet.com
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I love the concept behind this.  I wonder how much safer it actually makes intersections, but maybe there are other benefits (calories burned during a dance break?) that could make it a smart city intervention?

smartercities:

Smart ideas can turn city into a better place, here’s one. The dancing traffic light.

Source: smartercities
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"One of my rules of thumb is that whenever everyone agrees on something, it doesn’t necessarily mean they’re wrong, but it almost certainly means that nobody’s thought about it."

- Peter Thiel (via brycedotvc)
Source: brycedotvc
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I now know what I want for my birthday: a salmon canon!

fastcompany:

Ka-Pow: Watch These Fish Cannons Shoot Salmon Safely Over Dams

Salmon have serious swimming skills—some travel thousands of miles to return to their original homes to breed. But even though they can jump as high as 12 feet in the air, they can’t manage to get over massive concrete dams that we have built to block their journeys back to their homes. Now one new idea could give them a boost. The plan involves whisking the fish through a long vacuum tube at speeds up to 22 miles per hour and then shooting them out the other end like a cannon.

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Source: fastcoexist.com
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jesarux:

listoflifehacks:

If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

roblogging for future use

(via nowyoukno)

Source: listoflifehacks
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Pianophase.com is a performance and visualization of the first section from Steve Reich’s 1967 piece Piano Phase. Two pianists repeat the same twelve note sequence, but one gradually speeds up. The musical patterns are visualized by drawing two lines, one following each pianist. The sound is performed live in the browser with the Web Audio API, and drawn with HTML5 Canvas.

created by Alexander Chen

I love this.

Source: ilovecharts
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It’s always nice to hear I haven’t doomed my marriage before it’s even started.

newsweek:

For years, social scientists have tried to explain why living together before marriage seemed to increase the likelihood of a couple divorcing. Now, new research released by the nonpartisan Council on Contemporary Families gives an answer: It doesn’t. And it probably never has.
This is despite two decades of warnings from academics and social commentators who pointed to studies that claimed a correlation between “shacking up” and splitting up—warnings that increased as the number of couples living together before marriage skyrocketed.
As it turns out, those studies that linked premarital cohabitation and divorce were measuring the wrong variable, says Arielle Kuperburg, a professor at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro, who produced much of the research released Monday.
The biggest predictor of divorce, she says, is actually the age at which a couple begins living together, whether before the wedding vows or after.
Best predictor of divorce? Age when couples cohabit, study says

It’s always nice to hear I haven’t doomed my marriage before it’s even started.

newsweek:

For years, social scientists have tried to explain why living together before marriage seemed to increase the likelihood of a couple divorcing. Now, new research released by the nonpartisan Council on Contemporary Families gives an answer: It doesn’t. And it probably never has.

This is despite two decades of warnings from academics and social commentators who pointed to studies that claimed a correlation between “shacking up” and splitting up—warnings that increased as the number of couples living together before marriage skyrocketed.

As it turns out, those studies that linked premarital cohabitation and divorce were measuring the wrong variable, says Arielle Kuperburg, a professor at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro, who produced much of the research released Monday.

The biggest predictor of divorce, she says, is actually the age at which a couple begins living together, whether before the wedding vows or after.

Best predictor of divorce? Age when couples cohabit, study says

(via howstuffworks)

Source: cnbc.com
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